Top 35 Free DIY Chicken Coop Plans


“There are so many chicken coop plans out there that it can be a little overwhelming. Fortunately, this list is here to do some of the work for you, getting you up and building your chicken coops that much faster. Best of all, it’s free!”

– Dave Malcolm –

This list is great for anyone who is looking to add a chicken coop to their property and doesn’t want to pay for one that’s been pre-built. It’s an extensive list that compiles chicken coop plans from all over the web, from detailed blueprints to step-by-step YouTube guides. This list will help you get a rough idea of how big your chicken coop will be, how many chickens you can keep without crowding and how much it will cost to build. Whether you’re a seasoned coop builder or have never picked up a power tool in your life, there’s a coop on this list for everyone, of any skill level and in most price ranges.

Things to consider before choosing a chicken coop plan

chicken coop locationHow to choose a location to build a chicken coop

The best location for a chicken coop is flat land with plenty of room for both the coop and a spacious run. The coop should be in an area that’s easy to access since you’ll need to make trips to your coop every day to collect eggs and refill the food and water dispensers. It’s best to keep the coop as close as your house as possible, which is especially important for keeping an eye out for predators if your area has them, but not so close that your house becomes infested with flies. It’s a good idea to keep your coop near wherever you store fresh bedding, feed and tools, whether that’s a shed or another storage area.

What chicken coop size do you need?

The size of the chicken coop you’ll need depends on how many chickens you want to keep, and whether those chickens are heavier breeds, average-sized or bantams. The rule is that you need at least three square feet of space per average-sized chicken, plus more space for them to roam freely. If the coop is too small, and you have too many chickens, they may feel cramped and stressed and they won’t lay properly. If you don’t plan to sell eggs or raise chickens for meat, three or four chickens will produce more than enough eggs for your daily household needs.

You’ll also need to consider how much room you have for your coop. Keep in mind that larger coops are more difficult to move around unless they have attached wheels. Make sure you start building the coop where you plan to put it if possible so you don’t end up having to move it!

chicken coop designChoosing a right chicken coop design

In choosing a chicken coop design, there are a few things to consider. Will the coop fit where you intend to put it? How easy will it be to clean? Do you want a large or a small run, do you want it to be attached to the coop and does it need to be enclosed to keep your chickens safe from daytime predators? If your area has digging predators, you’ll need a coop with a solid floor.

You should keep your area’s climate in mind: do you need insulation to keep your chickens warm during the long winter nights, or do you need to keep your coop ventilated in order to protect your chickens from heatstroke? If your area experiences heavy rain, you may want to choose a lifted coop with a sloped roof.

The last variable to consider is the appearance of the coop. If you plan to put the coop where it’ll be visible to others, you may want to go with a pleasant design to keep your property value up and your neighbors from filing complaints.

How much will it cost to build?

The cost of building a coop depends on the material you use and the size of the coop. Larger coops need more materials, which means they’ll cost more to build. It’s a good idea to try to seek out used and recycled materials to save money. Hardware stores often have cull bins for imperfect wood which you can get at discounted prices or for free. It may be cheaper to buy lumber directly from the sawmill rather than through hardware stores. You can also check your local Craigslist page for free or cheap, unwanted materials that you can incorporate into the coop.

How much time will it take to build a chicken coop?

The time it will take for you to construct a coop depends on the size, the complexity of the design and your own carpentry experience. A larger coop will take longer to build, as will a complex design, and if you’re a beginner at carpentry, it will take you longer to construct the coop than if you’re a seasoned expert. Now, onto the chicken coop plans!

2x4 chicken coop plan

1. ReStore A-Frame Chicken Coop Plan

This chicken coop is simple, easy and can be built on the cheap with scrap materials. The nesting area comes with a door, one nesting box and a trap door for collecting eggs. The bottom of the coop can be covered with chicken wire to create a small 12 square foot run; you’ll need additional space to let your chickens wander during the day. This would be great for a 4H or FFA member on a budget planning on raising some chickens for their county fair.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x3’6¾”
  • Capacity: 3-4 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $50-100

Pros

  • Easy to build
  • Inexpensive
  • Fits almost anywhere

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Not visually pleasing
  • Not insulated

Gable style 12x3 chicken coop plan2. Harriet’s House Chicken Coop Plan

Harriet’s House is a nice little coop design complete with a fully enclosed and attached run, a hinged pair of nest boxes, and a lifted coop with a ramp and a removable, slide-out perch. The plain plywood siding can be painted and the roof can be shingled to add a nice touch to your backyard or small farm.

Specifications

  • Size: 12’x3’4”
  • Capacity: 4-5 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Easy to build
  • Inexpensive
  • Fits almost anywhere

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Somewhat difficult to build

Lifted 7x3 chicken coop plan3. DIY Chicken Coop

This chicken coop resembles a tiny barn complete with red walls, white trimming, and a sloped, corrugated plastic roof, though the exact look can be changed to suit your tastes and budget. It looks a bit different from the other coops in that the entire coop is lifted; there’s no need to ruin your back bending down to collect the day’s batch of eggs. It comes with a large door and hinged nesting boxes, plus it can hold a decent amount of chickens. If you live in an area that’s prone to flooding, this may be the coop you’re looking for. However, if your region frequently gets hurricane winds, there’s a risk that the coop will fall over, injuring your chickens and damaging the coop.

Specifications

  • Size: 7’11”x3’4”
  • Capacity: 7-8 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Lifted
  • Swinging door for easy access
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Sloped roof
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • Unsteady; not good for areas with high winds

Large hoop pen 8x8 chicken coop plan4. Plan of Hoop Pen

This pen is an economic way to get a coop up fast and raise many chickens at once. It’s more-or-less a large wire hoop covered with a tarp to protect your chickens from the elements. It works on the principle of letting your chickens free-graze and then moving the entire pen to another location when the chickens have grazed an area clean. This may not be the best choice if your area has digging predators unless you opt to alter the design with a floor and install a feed dispenser. This is a great option for raising broiler chickens.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’5”x8’5”
  • Capacity: 20 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $50-100

Pros

  • Inexpensive
  • Easy to move
  • Easy to access
  • Options for ventilation
  • Holds many chickens

Cons

  • Not visually appealing
  • Not well-insulated
  • Not easy to clean
  • No solid floor

Simple 3x3 chicken coop plan5. Simple Chicken Coop Plan

This is a good option if you’re worried about something (or someone) swiping your chickens. It resembles a large, box-shaped safe that can be secured with a hasp and lock. This may not be the best option if you live in an area prone to heavy rain because of the flat roof, but you can modify the shape to give the roof a bit of a slope. You can also attach a very small, enclosed run to the coop.

Specifications

  • Size: 3’4”x3’
  • Capacity: 4 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $50-100

Pros

  • Inexpensive
  • Easy to access
  • Easy to clean
  • Attached run
  • Easy to build

Cons

  • Not very pleasant to look at
  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Flat roof
  • Not easy to collect eggs

Long 8x2 chicken coop plan6. Long Chicken Coop

This coop is unique in its shape that resembles a very long barn. Its peculiar shape makes it a bit hard to clean out, but thankfully it has a sliding roof door for easier access. The roof also has a little swinging egg door that you can use to reach inside and collect eggs without disturbing the coop too much. It’s solid, which means that it’s sturdy, but you may want to think about cutting in windows for ventilation.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x2’
  • Capacity: 5-6 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $200-300

Pros

  • Easy to access
  • Nice to look
  • Sturdy
  • Simple design

Cons

  • No insulation
  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Hard to clean
  • Can’t collect eggs without disturbing coop
  • No attached run

Lean-to 8x4 chicken coop plan7. Downeast Thunder Farm’s Chicken Coop

This is a great, no-nonsense coop that resembles a small shed with a sloped roof. If you hate cleaning coops out, this coop would be great for you because it has a slide-out bottom that can be cleaned with ease. It’s sturdy, with solid side paneling and a steel roof, but you can adjust the design according to your price range. A window provides ventilation, and you can add insulation to the walls if needed. It also has a slide-up chicken door that could potentially lead to a small run with a ramp. Overall, it’s a very basic yet malleable design.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x4’
  • Capacity: 10-11 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $400-500

Pros

  • Holds a decent amount of chickens
  • Sloped roof
  • Easy to clean
  • Decent to look at

Cons

  • Can’t collect eggs without disturbing coop
  • No attached run

Classic 16x8 chicken coop plan8. Mammy’s 1985 Chicken House Plan

This coop has very classic, rustic charm. It’s also very spacious and will hold all the chickens you could ever want, which is especially good if you’re planning on selling eggs for profit. This coop is much too large for any backyard; it’s best placed on a small, private farm. The spacious inside can be decked out with six or more nesting boxes and roosting poles. The high roof makes it easy to access, so you can sweep it clean. Make sure you attach the chicken access door to a spacious, enclosed area. This coop is going to run you up quite a bit, so only choose it if you’re serious about raising chickens as a business.

Specifications

  • Size: 16’2’’x8’3’’
  • Capacity: 42-43 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 9-10
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Price to build: $4000-5000

Pros

  • Holds a decent amount of chickens
  • Sloped roof
  • Easy to access
  • Options for ventilation and insulation
  • Very pricey

Cons

  • Cannot be moved after it’s built

Large pallet 16x8 chicken coop plan9. Pallet Palace Chicken Coop Plan

If you don’t want to spend a lot of money on your chicken project and you’re not very well-versed in construction, this is a good coop for you. If you know where to find pallets for free, this project can potentially cost you next to nothing. It’s all very easy to put together, although it may not be the most sturdy or attractive-looking option on the list. Plus, it holds all the chickens you could ever need.

Specifications

  • Size: 16’x8’
  • Capacity: 41-42 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $50-100

Pros

  • Holds a decent amount of chickens
  • Easy to access
  • Inexpensive
  • Well-ventilated

Cons

  • Flimsy
  • Flat roof
  • Not very pleasant to look at

Urban 6x3 chicken coop plan10. Urban Chicken Coop Plan

If you live in the city or the suburbs and you don’t have very much space for a coop, this coop may be right up your alley. It’s very small and very functional, utilizing every bit of space. It has a swinging door for easy access and cleaning, a chicken hatchway with a ramp and a run and the bottom area is surrounded by chicken wire with a little swinging door for even more run space.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x3’
  • Capacity: 5-6 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $200-300

Pros

  • Fit almost anywhere
  • Easy to access
  • Sloped roof
  • Attached run
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Not well-ventilated

Small backyard 6x3 chicken coop plan11. The “South City” Coop Plan

This another coop that’s great for a small backyard. Like the last coop, it utilizes as much space as possible while being visually appealing and comfortable for you chickens. It has large swinging doors for easy access, windows for ventilation, a lamp, a ramp leading to a small hatchway and a small run underneath the coop, plus an additional enclosed run. It would fit snugly right alongside your house or garage.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x3’
  • Capacity: 5-6 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $200-300

Pros

  • Fit almost anywhere
  • Easy to access
  • Sloped roof
  • Attached run
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens

Cabin style 5x3 chicken coop plan12. Wichita Cabin Coop Plan

This chicken coop has nice rustic charm and would look great in your backyard or nearby your little old-fashioned cabin in the woods. It has a small attached run, a paving-stone base, a lifted coop, a few small windows for ventilation and an attached egg box with a hinged lid. This is a good choice if you’re worried about predators preying on your chickens because it’s a bit more solid than some of the options on the list.

Specifications

  • Size: 5’x3’
  • Capacity: 5 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $400-500

Pros

  • Well-ventilated
  • Sturdy
  • Easy to clean
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens

7x4 chicken coop tractor plan13. Birdsinbethel’s Chicken Coop Tractor

If you’re looking for a coop that’s easy to move around, look no further! This mobile coop comes with wheels and a handle for extra maneuverability. This coop is great for letting your chickens free-range graze, as you can easily relocate the coop to fresh pastures. The top portion of the enclosure serves as the coop, while the lower portion is a run of equal size. The coop has swinging doors for easy access and a two windows for cross-ventilation. Plus, you can paint the coop to look like a quaint little barn.

Specifications

  • Size: 7’x4’
  • Capacity: 9-10 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $400-500

Pros

  • Mobile
  • Swinging doors for easy access
  • Sloped roof
  • Decent ventilation
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • Can’t collect eggs without disturbing coop
  • No insulation

Mobile 8x4 chicken coop plan14. Cluckingham Palace

If you were drawn in by that clever name, you’re not the only one. This is the second mobile coop on the list and one of the best-looking coops on the list too. You can use the plan to build a basic coop, or you can spend a little more to deck it out with nice stained wood paneling, planter boxes and clean white trim.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x4’
  • Capacity: 9-10 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $200-500

Pros

  • Mobile
  • Swinging doors for easy access
  • Sloped roof
  • Decent ventilation
  • Very nice to look at

Cons

  • No attached run

A-frame 8x2 chicken coop plan15. A-Frame Chicken Coop Plan

This coop is similar to the ReStore A-Frame Chicken Coop. The chicken coop has a hinged lid for easy access and the coop rests on a small run with a ramp. If you’re looking for simple, lightweight and easy to move, this is a good choice. This is another coop that’s ideal for letting your chickens free-graze and moving them to fresh pastures every so often.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x2’5’’
  • Capacity: 3-4 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $50-100

Pros

  • Easy to move
  • Easy to build
  • Inexpensive

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Can’t remove eggs without disturbing coop
  • Nothing special to look at

Shed style 8x4 chicken coop plan16. Shed Chicken Coop Plan

This chicken coop is very quaint and looks more like a small house for your chickens than a shed. It’s tall enough to walk in with ease, but you won’t have to walk in to collect eggs because the nesting boxes are attached to the side with a hinged lid. There’s one window on the plan, but you can cut one or two more if you’re worried about your chickens overheating. A small ramp cut out of the back of the shed can lead into a yard or an enclosed run. The plan also includes bright colors and hanging flowers, making the shed a lovely addition to your backyard or farm.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’2¾’’x4’3’’
  • Capacity: 10-11 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Sloped roof
  • Easy to access
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Very visually pleasing

Cons

  • No attached run
  • Needs more ventilation

Small lean-to 8x4 chicken coop plan17. Small Chicken Coop Plan

The title says “small,” but the plan is actually fairly large compared to some of the other plans. This chicken coop is almost identical in appearance to the shed chicken coop mentioned above. It has a similar shape, windows on both ends for cross-ventilation and attached nest boxes with a hinged lid like the previous example. This plan also has a small walk-up ramp leading into the coop itself through the access door. This plan doesn’t have a door just for the chickens like the last example, but you can easily add one yourself if you’d like.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x3’9’’
  • Capacity: 9-10 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Sloped roof
  • Easy to access
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • No attached run

Gable 8x4 chicken coop plan18. The Chicken Project Chicken Coop

This is another shed coop design, popular because of the simple design, how easy they are to access and the ability to keep a decent amount of chickens. This design has a vent and a large window to keep your chickens cool in the summer. The main access door is on the side rather than the front, but there’s a small door for the chickens that leads to an attached, enclosed run. This coop doesn’t have any glaring setbacks, though you may want to add more insulation to the walls if your region gets especially cold.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x4’6’’
  • Capacity: 12 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 3-4
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $500-600

Pros

  • Sloped roof
  • Easy to access
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Well-ventilated
  • Nice to look at

Cons

Ultimate 6x6 chicken coop plan19. The Ultimate Chicken Coop Plan

This coop lives up to its “ultimate” title. The plans come with three nesting boxes with a hinged lid, two windows for cross-ventilation, an access door, a small chicken hatchway, several perches and even a storage area. This one doesn’t have a plan for an attached run, but you can surely borrow a plan from another example on this list.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x6’
  • Capacity: 12 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 3-4
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $500-600

Pros

  • Well-ventilated
  • Sloped roof
  • Easy to access
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Storage area
  • Nice to look at

Cons

  • No attached run

Raised 6x4 chicken coop plan20. Barngeek Chicken Coop Plan

This is a great little coop that would normally be quite expensive to buy but can be built for much cheaper. The coop is slightly raised, and the entire bottom area can be enclosed to make a small run. It has two windows for cross-ventilation and two attached nest box areas with hinged lids. It has a large access door for easy cleaning, but it could use an access ramp and additional door for the chickens.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x4’
  • Capacity: 8 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Sloped roof
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Raised coop
  • Additional space for run
  • Nice to look at

Cons

  • Could use a ramp for easier access
  • Could use a small chicken access door with ramp

Simple to build 4x4 chicken coop plan21. Trictle’s Chicken Coop

This is a small and simple-to-build coop, great for a beginner who wants a nice addition to their backyard. The coop is raised and the space underneath can be enclosed with chicken wire to make a tiny run. It has two windows with shutters, an attached nesting box with a hinged opening, a hinged door and a little planter box. It might be ideal to add a ramp to the door to let your chickens roam during the day without having to pick them up and put them down.

Specifications

  • Size: 4’x4’
  • Capacity: 4-5 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $100-200

Pros

  • Easy to build
  • Sloped roof
  • Inexpensive
  • Raised coop
  • Well-ventilated
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • No easy access for the chickens

Small 3x2 chicken coop plan22. Trictle’s Chicken Coop Plan

This is a small and simple-to-build coop, great for a beginner who wants a nice addition to their backyard. The coop is raised and the space underneath can be enclosed with chicken wire to make a tiny run. It has two windows with shutters, an attached nesting box with a hinged opening, a hinged door and a little planter box. It might be ideal to add a ramp to the door to let your chickens roam during the day without having to pick them up and put them down.

Specifications

  • Size: 2’8½’’x2’1’’
  • Capacity: 1-2 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $50-100

Pros

  • Doubles as a transport carrier
  • Easy to clean
  • Easy to access
  • Well-ventilated

Cons

  • Holds very few chickens
  • Small attached run

Easy to build 6x4 chicken coop plan23. Very Simple Chicken Coop Plan

This coop is truly simple and great for a beginner who wants to keep a decent amount of chickens. It has a main access door with a ramp that can lead to an enclosed run, one shuttered window, a vent and attached nesting boxes with a hinged lid. This coop isn’t easy to access and will be more difficult to clean unless you adjust the plan to include a slide-out bottom or a hinged roof. You can also cut out an additional window to give your chickens a nice cross-breeze.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x3’9’’
  • Capacity: 6-7 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $200-300

Pros

  • Easy to build
  • Well-ventilated
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Nice to look at

Cons

  • Not easy to clean
  • No attached run

Tropical 4x4 chicken coop plan24. Tropical Chicken Coop Plan

This coop is ideal if you live in a tropical climate that doesn’t get too cold in the winter but gets hot and humid in the summer. It trades coop space for open air with the bottom portion serving as a small run. The sloped roof keeps it safe from heavy rain. There are swinging doors to access the egg boxes, though you won’t need as many as are shown in the plan: only one or two, and leave space to reach in and clean the coop. This coop may be a little prone to falling over, which is not good if you live in an area that gets hurricane winds. You can adjust this by bolting it down firmly into the ground.

Specifications

  • Size: 4’x4’
  • Capacity: 4-5 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Good for tropical climates
  • Very well-ventilated
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Sloped roof

Cons

  • Top-heavy
  • Not as nice to look at
  • Doesn’t hold many chickens

Spacious 6x6 chicken coop plan25. Home and Garden Chicken Coop Plan

If you really want to spruce up your yard or small farm, this is the coop or you. This spacious, sturdy chicken coop comes with a fully enclosed, attached run, so you don’t have to worry about predators. It has two windows, a large main access door, attached nest boxes with a hinged lid and a small access door for the chickens to move freely into the run.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’11½’’x6’11½’’
  • Capacity: 15-16 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 4-5
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $600-700

Pros

  • Attached run
  • Holds many chickens
  • Well-ventilated
  • Easy to access and clean
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

Cabin 6x6 chicken coop plan26. Fox’s Log Cabin Chicken Coop Plan

Log cabins have a timeless charm, so a chicken coop designed to look like a log cabin is extra charming. If you have property in the woods, you can build this coop on the cheap using small logs around your house. Simply add a corrugated metal roof, chicken wire, a window, a swinging door, a linoleum floor and some nest boxes. A big plus if you live in a log cabin, too.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x6’
  • Capacity: 11-12 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Attached run
  • Well-ventilated
  • Quaint charm

Cons

  • Sloped roof
  • Not well-insulated
  • Not easy to collect eggs

Old car chicken coop plan27. Old Car Chicken Coop 

This coop is so unique that it just had to be added to the list. If you care about the environment and have an old car lying around, this coop has your name on it. It’s the epitome of easy to build. All you have to do is gut your old, non-running car if it isn’t gutted already, strip anything that might be hazardous to your chickens, sand down any sharp edges, wrap any openings with chicken wire and add a small swinging door. It may be a bit of an eyesore unless you really love old cars.

Specifications

  • Size: Varies
  • Capacity: 4-5 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $50-100

Pros

  • Good for the environment
  • Well-ventilated
  • Very inexpensive

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Not easy to clean
  • Not very pretty

Luke's lean-to 4x4 chicken coop plan28. Luke’s Chicken Coop

This chicken coop is a first-time project, so it shouldn’t be too difficult for anyone who has basic carpentry skills but has never constructed a coop before. It includes fiberglass insulation, a corrugated steel roof, a pulley door, recycled material and material found in nature; these can all be adjusted based on your particular region and access to materials. In order to make your run more resistant to predators, consider burying the wire up to a foot underground and adding a roof.

Specifications

  • Size: 4’x4′
  • Capacity: 5-6 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 3-4
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $400-500

Pros

  • Attached run
  • Well-insulated
  • Solid coop floor
  • Visually pleasing

Cons

  • A little flimsy
  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Nest boxes are not lifted

Suburban 4x4 chicken coop plan29. Backyard Suburban Chicken Coop

This design would be great for a backyard if you live in or near the suburbs. The main selling point on this chicken coop is that it’s easy to clean, with a bottom collection tray that can be dumped and refilled with bedding. The design includes three nesting boxes, a sloped, corrugated metal roof, and a small, enclosed run with a ramp. You’ll have to use additional space to let your chickens roam during the day; a fenced-in backyard would be ideal if you don’t have anything the chickens can damage.

Specifications

  • Size: 4’x4′
  • Capacity: 5-6 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 3-4
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $400-500

Pros

  • Easy to clean
  • Attached run
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Visually appealing
  • Somewhat ventilated

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Small run
  • Not well-insulated

Lambert's lean-to 6x4 chicken coop plan30. Lambert’s Chicken Coop

This fairly-spacious coop would look great on your small farm. The lifted coop and attached run together add up to six feet by twelve feet, and it’s all enclosed to keep your chickens safe from predators. It comes with three nesting boxes, a metal roof, an easy-to-clean linoleum floor, three nesting boxes and a neat guillotine door that can be opened from outside the run. The creator of the plan recommends that you anchor the coop down to keep it from blowing over in high winds.

Specifications

  • Size: 6’x4′
  • Capacity: 8 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 3-4
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $400-500

Pros

  • Holds a good amount of chickens
  • Easy to clean
  • Sloped roof
  • Attached run
  • Well-insulated and well-ventilated
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Fairly pleasant to look at

Cons

  • Plans aren’t quite step-by-step

Old house 4x4 chicken coop plan31. This Old House Chicken Coop

This coop is nice enough to be included in a professional television production. It makes a nice addition to a large backyard or a small farm. The coop is lifted off the ground and the attached run is buried several inches into the ground in order to deter predators. You can easily add some insulation and cut in windows for ventilation. Tip: don’t include the bottom row of nesting boxes. Instead, allow the four remaining nesting boxes to be a little lifted off the coop floor. Check the video description for the exact steps!

Specifications

  • Size: 4’x4′
  • Capacity: 4-5 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Sloped roof
  • Attached run
  • Lifted coop
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • No ventilation or insulation
  • Can’t collect eggs without disturbing coop

Gable 5x4 chicken coop plan32. homesteadonomics Chicken Coop

This chicken is very solid, looks great and isn’t incredibly difficult to build due to its simple shape. More than any other coop on the list, it resembles a tiny house! For a nice little touch, you can paint the paneling and siding to match your own house. It has some great added details, like roosting bars made from small pine logs and corrugated asphalt panels for roofing. The vents will keep your chickens from overheating, and they can slip easily in and out through the main access door. The coop even includes an automatic watering system.

Specifications

  • Size: 5’5”x4′
  • Capacity: 7-8 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $300-400

Pros

  • Well-ventilated
  • Well-insulated
  • Fairly easy to build
  • Holds a decent amount of chickens
  • Solid
  • Raised coop
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Very nice to look at

Cons

  • Somewhat difficult to move around

Mark's extra large 8x8 chicken coop plan33. Mark’s Chicken Coop

If you have live in a region where the temperature fluctuates, you’re worried about predators and you’re serious about raising chickens, this coop may be a good choice. The large coop resembles a small house with windows and a sliding screen door for ventilation during the hot summer months. The run is fully enclosed and you can play with the dimensions if you want to give your chickens more space to roam. If your area has digging predators, it’s recommended that you bury the mesh that surrounds the run at least a foot under the ground. Unfortunately, there are no step-by-step directions, so you’ll have to use the video for inspiration to draw your own specific plans.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x8′
  • Capacity: 21-22 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 3-5
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Price to build: $1000-1500

Pros

  • Well-ventilated
  • Well-insulated
  • Holds many chickens
  • Easy to access
  • Enclosed run
  • Pleasant to look at

Cons

  • No step-by-step plans
  • Very large and difficult to move
  • Can’t remove eggs without disturbing coop
  • Pricey

Stan's lean-to 8x8 chicken coop plan34. Stan’s Chicken Coop

This chicken coop is a large enclosure with six attached nesting boxes, so you don’t have to climb into the coop to collect eggs. It’s a great coop for a hot climate, though it doesn’t provide much protection from the cold, wind and damp. It features a galvanized metal roof and a swinging door for easy access. This is a great option if you’re looking to raise broilers and you live in an area with harsh summer days. No step-by-step plans for this one; you’ll have to try to follow the design yourself.

Specifications

  • Size: 8’x8′
  • Capacity: 20-21 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 1-2
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Price to build: $600-700

Pros

  • Easy to access
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Well-ventilated
  • Holds many chickens

Cons

  • No step-by-step plans
  • No attached run
  • Dirt floor
  • Not well-insulated

Fleming's small 4x3 chicken coop plan35. E. Fleming’s Chicken Coop

This is another lifted chicken coop that’s easy to access and doesn’t require bending down to collect eggs. Since it’s a bit unsteady, it may not be the best option if you live in an area with high winds. This is a very simple design with most the necessities, like an attached nesting box with a lid, a swinging door, windows for ventilation and perches. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have a ramp or an attached run.

Specifications

  • Size: 4’x3’5”
  • Capacity: 3-4 Chickens
  • Time to build (days): 2-3
  • Difficulty: Medium
  • Price to build: $600-700

Pros

  • Easy to access
  • Easy to collect eggs
  • Lifted coop
  • Well-ventilated

Cons

  • No attached run
  • Doesn’t hold many chickens
  • Unsteady
  • Nothing special to look at

We Hope You Found Your Chicken Coop Plan!

And that’s the list! We hope that you found the perfect plan. If you know of any spectacular chicken coop plans that we missed, feel free to share them in the comments. Good luck with your chicken coops!